What is robotic-assisted surgery?

Learn about robotic-assisted surgery and search for local surgeons.

What is
robotic-assisted
surgery?

Typical Incision Size

1/2 inch

Visualization

3D high-definition video projected in front of surgeon’s eyes

Instruments

Instruments with more movement than the human hand, and needle and thread

Typical Incision Size: 1/2 inch

Visualization: 3D high-definition video projected in front of surgeon’s eyes

Instruments: Instruments with more movement than the human hand, and needle and thread

Robotic-assisted surgery is one of two minimally invasive approaches to repairing your hernia. With robotic-assisted surgery, your surgeon will sit at a console next to you and operate through a few small incisions using tiny instruments, including a 3D high definition camera. This camera enables a crystal-clear and magnified view of your hernia.

Your surgeon fully controls all instruments. Every hand movement is translated by the
da Vinci® System in real-time to bend and rotate the instruments for a precise repair of your hernia.

Enter your zip code below to find a Robotic-Assisted Surgeon.

How might
you feel
after surgery?

Results vary, but if you are an appropriate candidate for minimally invasive surgery, robotic-assisted hernia surgery may be a good option for you. In early studies*, people reported feeling less pain during recovery from robotic-assisted hernia surgery than after laparoscopic surgery.1
A patient survey study also suggested that most people felt little to no pain one week after robotic-assisted hernia surgery.2

  • Early studies include a single-hospital published study on inguinal hernia1 and unpublished results from an inguinal hernia market research study conducted by Intuitive Surgical, presented at ISPOR 2017 Annual International Meeting.2 The results from these studies may not be generalizable.

When might
you feel better?

Everyone is different, but in a market research study*, patients reported less pain, and said they experienced less disruption in their daily activities following robotic-assisted hernia surgery as compared to open and laparoscopic surgery.

Specifically:

  • Most people reported less disruption to daily activities.
  • 86% of patients reported they were not using pain medication 1-2 weeks later.
  • This market research is from an inguinal hernia market research study conducted by Intuitive Surgical, presented at ISPOR 2017 Annual International Meeting.2 The results from this study may not be generalizable.

We could all
use more time.

Early studies* suggest that people who receive robotic-assisted hernia repair report less pain1,2 and may get home from the hospital sooner than those who receive laparoscopic or open surgery.3,4 This means getting back to what matters most to you.

  • Early studies include a published study on inguinal hernia,1 unpublished results from an inguinal hernia market research study conducted by Intuitive Surgical, presented at ISPOR 2017 Annual International Meeting2 and published studies on ventral hernia.3,4 The results from these studies may not be generalizable.

Robotic-Assisted
Surgeon Locator

If you and your doctor decide robotic-assisted surgery may be right for you, this tool can assist you in finding a surgeon offering robotic-assisted surgery.

Enter your zip code below to find a Robotic-Assisted Surgeon.

References

  1. Single center unmatched, non-controlled, small sample retrospective experience. Results may not be generalizable.
    Kimberly E. Waite, Comparison of robotic versus laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair, J Robotic Surg DOI 10.1007/s11701-016-0580-1.
  2. Internal non-case matched data analysis; not peer reviewed, not published. Results may not be generalizable. Quantitative market research study / expressed opinions of patients that received open, laparoscopic or da Vinci inguinal hernia repair in the past year.
    Reduced Patient Pain Perception with da Vinci® Inguinal Hernia. Reference: Intuitive ventral studies Surgical Pain Perceptions Survey, November 2016. n = 526 patients. Presented at ISPOR 2017.
  3. Multicenter data analysis from AHSQC database Ajita S. Prabhu, Laparoscopic vs Robotic Intraperitoneal Mesh Repair for Incisional Hernia: An Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative Analysis, Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Feb 2017
  4. Two-center case matched, small sample experience. Results may not be generalizable. Luis A Martin-delCampo, Comparative Analysis of Perioperative Outcomes of Robotic Versus Open Transversus Abdominis Release. Presented at SAGES 2017.

Important Safety Information
There are risks specific to hernia repair procedures (ventral/incisional, incisional, umbilical, inguinal), including: recurrence, bowel injury, infection of mesh, urinary retention. For inguinal hernia repair: testicular injury.
For Important Safety Information, indications for use, risks, full cautions and warnings, please refer to www.davincisurgery.com/safety and www.intuitivesurgical.com/safety.

da Vinci Xi® System Precaution Statement
The demonstration of safety and effectiveness for the specific procedure(s) discussed in this material was based on evaluation of the device as a surgical tool and did not include evaluation of outcomes related to the treatment of cancer (overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence) or treatment of the patient’s underlying disease/condition. Device usage in all surgical procedures should be guided by the clinical judgment of an adequately trained surgeon.

Site sponsored by Intuitive Surgical. Note: If you are experiencing sudden, intense pain in your abdomen or groin that you suspect may be a hernia, contact your doctor immediately or visit the Emergency Room. Unless otherwise noted, all people depicted are models.
PN 1035520 Rev A 8/2017